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2 edition of Branchial blood flow in the dogfish (scyliorhinus canicula). found in the catalog.

Branchial blood flow in the dogfish (scyliorhinus canicula).

Julian David Metcalfe

Branchial blood flow in the dogfish (scyliorhinus canicula).

by Julian David Metcalfe

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  • 9 Currently reading

Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Birmingham, Dept of Zoology and Comparative Physiology.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13796074M

Gilmour, KM and Perry, SF (). Branchial membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase activity maintains CO2 excretion in severely anemic dogfish. Am. J. Physiol. , RR Gilmour, KM, Desforges, PR, and Perry, SF (). Buffering limits plasma HCO3- dehydration when red blood cell anion exchange is inhibited. Respir. Physiol. Neurobiol. Respiration and Gaseous Exchange. - the blood flow through the gills opposes the flow of water through the lamellae (countercurrent flow) and maximizes the efficiency of diffusion - this is important because water has about 1/30th the oxygen concentration of air • develop from the skin ectoderm of the branchial area but are not.

  Here, the blood is oxygenated which then goes to the efferent branchial arteries. The blood exits the efferent branchial arteries to be carried into the dorsal aorta. Arteries carry the oxygenated blood to the rest of the organs and tissue of the head, trunk, and caudal regions. Perch has two divisions to its venous system. Contributors to this book. The blood flow in the artery and vein of the gill filament is indicated in figure 3. Notice the direction in which blood flows in the lamellae and compare this with.

The effects of increased flow rates on linear dominance hierarchies and physiological function in brown trout, Salmo trutta. Can. J. Zool. 80, Szebedinszky, C and Gilmour, KM. High plasma buffering and the absence of a red blood cell ß-NHE response in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Successor to the classic work in shark studies, The Elasmobranch Fishes by John Franklin Daniel (first published , revised and ), Sharks, Skates, and Rays provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of elasmobranch morphology. Coverage has been expanded from anatomy to include modern information on physiology and biochemistry.


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Branchial blood flow in the dogfish (scyliorhinus canicula) by Julian David Metcalfe Download PDF EPUB FB2

Diana Bell, in Head and Neck Pathology (Third Edition), Branchial Cleft Anomalies. Branchial cleft anomalies are divided according to the branchial apparatus involved and are further divided into cysts, sinuses, or fistulas.

When the name branchial cyst is used without further qualifications, it generally refers to a cyst of second branchial cleft origin, which accounts for 80% to 90% of. The efferent branchial arteries give off many branches. These carry oxygenated blood to the more anterior parts of the shark's body.

The four pairs of efferent branchial arteries join at the dorsal midline to form the large dorsal aorta. The dorsal aorta passes posteriorly, bringing oxygenated blood from the gills to virtually every part of the. Control of Gill Blood Flow. Vasomotor control of branchial resistance and intrabranchial blood flow distribution is complex, takes place at both pre- and post-lamellar sites in the arterioarterial and arteriovenous pathways, and involves numerous vasoactive mediators including autonomic nerves, circulating hormones, and locally released factors Cited by: 9.

Branchial blood flow in the dogfish book, A.P., Daxboeck, C. and Randall, D.J. () ‘The Effect of Input Pressure and Flow on the Pattern and Resistance to Flow in the Isolated Perfused Gill of a Teleost Fish’, Journal of Comparative Physiology,–40 Google ScholarCited by: This book and its companion, Fish Physiology, Vol Part B, are the first major syntheses of recent advances, general concepts, and species diversity of fish in almost 25 years.

It provides broad coverage of the major aspects of cardiovascular physiology and is a definitive sourcebook for the field. This book discusses the special design of the venous system in aquatic vertebrates. An Illustrated Guide to the Dissection of the Shark Introduction Sharks used in dissection classes are usually the dogfish: Squalus acanthias.

Because of its ready availability and primitive chordate structure, it is often the only fish a student will dissect in a comparative anatomy course. Tools you will need for the dissection are: Size: KB. Summary. In order to understand the blood flow patterns and their regulation in the gills and pulmonary artery ofAmbystoma tigrinum, the vascular resistance and vasoactivity of the two major branchial perfusion pathways and a vascular plexus in the pulmonary artery were investigated using an isolated-tissue perfusion choline and epinephrine were both pressor agents in all three Cited by: blood supply by shunting of blood either through the rete or partially by-passing it via alternate circulatory pathways and thereby altering the efficiency of the heat-exchange system (Linthicum.

Form, Function and Control of the Vasculature. vasodilation and increased gastrointestinal blood flow in spiny dogfish tively leads to an increased distribution of branchial blood flow to the.

In the centre of the tail is the vertebral column, consisting of a THE DOGFISH 19 centrum, circular in outline, and extending dorsally from it a neural arch, enclosing the spinal cord; and ventrally a similar haemal arch in which are two blood-vessels: above, the caudal artery (a continuation of the dorsal aorta) ; below, a caudal vein.

water vascular system is a network of water-filled canals used on locomotion and feeding; the ring canal serves as a water pump that distributes water to the five radial canals that go into each tube foot; radial canals are located in each arm and aid in delivering water to the arms; tube feet are located in arms and aid in locomotion, feeding, and respiration; ampullae in tube feet sotre.

blood will return to heart via deep vein. this vein is next to deep artery which has blood moving in the opposite direction. blood in deep vein is colder than blood moving to hand (since it just came from the heart).

therefore deep artery passes heat to deep vein and this ensures no heat is lost to external environment and deep vein blood is heated up before it gets to the heart.

In teleosts, a branchial metabolon links ammonia excretion to Na+ uptake via Rh glycoproteins and other transporters. Ureotelic elasmobranchs are thought to have low branchial ammonia permeability, and little is known about Rh function in this ancient group.

We cloned Rh cDNAs (Rhag, Rhbg and Rhp2) and evaluated gill ammonia handling in Squalus acanthias. Control ammonia Cited by: A gill (/ ɡ ɪ l / ()) is a respiratory organ found in many aquatic organisms that extracts dissolved oxygen from water and excretes carbon gills of some species, such as hermit crabs, have adapted to allow respiration on land provided they are kept microscopic structure of a gill presents a large surface area to the external environment.

Full text of "A TEXT BOOK OF VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY" See other formats. The Multifunctional Gut of Fish provides a comprehensive synthesis and an integrative overview of the range of gut functions and their implications for organismal physiology.

The highly diversified anatomy and functions of the gut, including nutrient uptake, immune barrier function, salt and water homeostasis and respiration, as well as neuroendocrine actions and control are covered in detail. Fish gills are organs that allow fish to breathe underwater. Most fish exchange gases like oxygen and carbon dioxide using gills that are protected under gill covers on both sides of the pharynx (throat).

Gills are tissues that are like short threads, protein structures called filaments have many functions including the transfer of ions and water, as well as the exchange of. These works a counter-current system in which the oxygenated water flows from the oral to aboral side of the gills, but the blood in lamellae flows in opposite direction, i.e., from aboral lamellar afferent to oral lamellar efferent blood vessels.

During this counter-flow of oxygenated water and blood, the oxygen enters the gill and carbon. Some oxygenated blood is diverted to a division of the secondary circulatory system—the central venous sinus (CVS) (Fig.

17), which is drained by filament veins that flow into the branchial vein and join the rest of the head veins, eventually into the heart via the Ductus cuvieri and the Sinus by: Muscarinic receptors are not involved in the nickel-induced constriction of vascular smooth muscle of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) ventral aorta.

Bull. Desert Isl. Biol. Lab. 29, Payne, J.A. and Evans, D.H. Changes in red cell pH and ion content during exposure of spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) to acute. In superb videomicroscopic studies (, ), it was demonstrated that the increase in gill resistance in the gill is secondary to the contraction of pillar cells, which separate the two surfaces of the gill lamellae and produce sheet flow of blood through the gill, which maximizes gas exchange (see Ref.

97 for a recent discussion of pillar Cited by:   The atrium is a one-way compartment for blood to flow into the ventricle (which does the pumping for the heart). The bulbus arteriosus is a large tube into which the blood is pumped from the ventricle. The Conus arteriosus then leads the blood to the ventral aorta, through which blood flows to .Purchase Encyclopedia of Fish Physiology - 1st Edition.

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